issue 37

L'edition

Louvre

issue 37

L'edition

Louvre

Letter from The Creative Director

Salut!

This week’s L’Edition is a rich discovery of our luminous Louvre collection and features a very special interview with Indigenous Australian artist Lloyd Gawura Hornsby. I hope you feel as inspired and moved as I do by his touching story.
I have been thoroughly enjoying our recent exploration of all things art this season; and our Louvre collection is a gorgeous addition to our current theme. Offering up a beautiful selection of wares for the shifting season, this latest release celebrates vibrant colour, a dash of chambray charm, delicate details, and paisley prints. Ultra-romantic, it blends both classic and modern elements, resulting in feminine and sophisticated style. Happy reading!

 Avec amour,

Picturesque
Paisley’s

Vibrant et romantique, our hero print of the collection boldly celebrates bright bursts of pinks, blues, and reds. Available in two must-have styles, our Paisley Frill Sleeve Midi Dress and Paisley Print Crew Shirt.

complete the look

complete the look

complete the look

complete the look

Chambray
Charme

Chambray
Charme

With cooler days ahead, our wear-everywhere chambray dress is a chic option for layering, or a simply stylish standalone piece. Crafted with chic details, including side pockets and a pull-tie waist, it’s a charming trans-seasonal choice. Pair it with our Francois Quilted Leather Plimsol for everyday elegance.

complete the look

complete the look

With cooler days ahead, our wear-everywhere chambray dress is a chic option for layering, or a simply stylish standalone piece. Crafted with chic details, including side pockets and a pull-tie waist, it’s a charming trans-seasonal choice. Pair it with our Francois Quilted Leather Plimsol for everyday elegance.

THE ARTISTIC ALCHEMY OF LLOYD GAWURA HORNSBY

This week we had the pleasure of interviewing Indigenous artist Lloyd Gawura Hornsby, a Koori Elder and descendant of the Yuin people for L’Edition. At 55, Lloyd embarked on a mission to reclaim his identity, which would forever alter the course of his life and art. His profound works are felt deeply and tell the story of his personal and ancestral history masterfully woven into the constellation. Today, at 75, Lloyd has exhibited his works all over Europe, including the world-famous Louvre.

How did you become an artist?

LLOYD HORNSBY: I have painted all my life. I had a couple of teachers at primary school that felt I had talent and supported me. At high school I had to leave at 14, the family needed the money. My art Teacher, Mrs Craw, paid for my first-year tuition at QUT and she gave me the books. I did nothing serious with my art for the next 40 years. At 55, I went to TAFE to learn how to mix paint. In 2005, I signed up at Griffith University and did a 4-year Bachelor of Indigenous Art and Culture. I owned a business, so I put a manager in to look after it for me, and I studied full time for 4 years Graduating in 2009. I sold my business the week I graduated and have been a full-time artist since.

“I had to find my family, imbed myself with my mob, and find out the stories.  If you can paint, once you know the stories, you do the sort of art I do. All of my artwork has a story on my family, my journey, history or the dreaming.”
“Coming to Australia” Acylic on canvas

Your paintings express so much feeling within them. What has been your personal journey with identity, and how has it shaped your subjects?

LLOYD HORNSBY: The qualification I studied for at Griffith University, while it was for Indigenous Art: the course does not teach you how to paint. I had to find my family, imbed myself with my mob, and find out the stories. If you can paint, once you know the stories, you do the sort of art I do.  All my artwork has a story on my family, my journey, history, or the dreaming. My grandmother left Wallaga Lakes in 1917 with her family (including my mother) settled in Stanthorpe and changed her identity to Māori because her dad was Chinese, and she thought she looked different. She did this so her children were not taken. My Nan kept her secret of being Māori until she died. I announced to the world my heritage when I was 55. I am Aboriginal Chinese and French. You take your moiety from your mother, or the female side of the family. My Nan was a Yuin Aboriginal woman, so I identify as Aboriginal.  I researched my family for my degree and have been following the Yuin stories ever since through family and elders and continue to paint these.

‘Coming to Australia’ blends your cultural heritage in such a powerful way. How long did it take to find your family?

LLOYD HORNSBY: My Nan was terrified her children would be taken. She told nobody in her family where her and her husband went to. So, when I had to find family, I had to start from Ground Zero. It has taken me over the past 20 years to find my family, it has been a wonderful journey.

You seem to paint beautiful constellations abundant in dream symbols, can you tell me more about their meaning?

LLOYD HORNSBY: I paint constellations images from the Hubble Telescope and intertwine my stories from the Yuin people into the constellation. The dreaming stories all started in the night sky. The night sky told when the seasons would change, from there they could tell what food would be available. Over 60 thousand years the Australian Aboriginal managed life from the stars.

“Art has always been a place where I go to heal, think and find my happy place.”
“Past Warriors” Acylic on canvas

What was like being asked to show your work at somewhere as iconic as the Louvre?

I did not believe it at first, I had AusTrade check it out for me. Usually, the Australian Government chooses an artist and makes the arrangements, but I was contacted directly and asked if I would consider exhibiting. I was thrilled. Since then, I have been asked to exhibit in the Monat Gallery in Madrid. I was also asked to represent Australia at the Climate Summit in Glasgow this year. It has certainly put my work on the map. My work is different from mainstream Aboriginal Artwork – I combine contemporary with traditional to complete the stories.

Where do you do currently create your paintings?

My wife of 55 years Wendy and I built a house and an art gallery in Glen Innes. Gawura Art Gallery. I have a studio on site and paint each day

How can people find out more about you and your work?

I sell a lot of work online www.gawuragallery.com and within the gallery. If the gallery is closed people can phone and make an appointment to see the artwork and have a chat with me about it. As we live on site this makes it easy.

GAWURA GALLERY, 9979 New England Highway, Glen Innes. Find out more at info@gawuragallery.com or get in touch E: info@gawuragallery.com

THE ARTISTIC ALCHEMY OF LLOYD GAWURA HORNSBY

This week we had the pleasure of interviewing Indigenous artist Lloyd Gawura Hornsby, a Koori Elder and descendant of the Yuin people for L’Edition. At 55, Lloyd embarked on a mission to reclaim his identity, which would forever alter the course of his life and art. His profound works are felt deeply and tell the story of his personal and ancestral history masterfully woven into the constellation. Today, at 75, Lloyd has exhibited his works all over Europe, including the world-famous Louvre.

How did you become an artist?

LLOYD HORNSBY: I have painted all my life. I had a couple of teachers at primary school that felt I had talent and supported me. At high school I had to leave at 14, the family needed the money. My art Teacher, Mrs Craw, paid for my first-year tuition at QUT and she gave me the books. I did nothing serious with my art for the next 40 years. At 55, I went to TAFE to learn how to mix paint. In 2005, I signed up at Griffith University and did a 4-year Bachelor of Indigenous Art and Culture. I owned a business, so I put a manager in to look after it for me, and I studied full time for 4 years Graduating in 2009. I sold my business the week I graduated and have been a full-time artist since.

“Coming to Australia” Acylic on canvas
“I had to find my family, imbed myself with my mob, and find out the stories.  If you can paint, once you know the stories, you do the sort of art I do. All of my artwork has a story on my family, my journey, history or the dreaming.”
Your paintings express so much feeling within them. What has been your personal journey with identity, and how has it shaped your subjects?

LLOYD HORNSBY: The qualification I studied for at Griffith University, while it was for Indigenous Art: the course does not teach you how to paint. I had to find my family, imbed myself with my mob, and find out the stories. If you can paint, once you know the stories, you do the sort of art I do.  All my artwork has a story on my family, my journey, history, or the dreaming. My grandmother left Wallaga Lakes in 1917 with her family (including my mother) settled in Stanthorpe and changed her identity to Māori because her dad was Chinese, and she thought she looked different. She did this so her children were not taken. My Nan kept her secret of being Māori until she died. I announced to the world my heritage when I was 55. I am Aboriginal Chinese and French. You take your moiety from your mother, or the female side of the family. My Nan was a Yuin Aboriginal woman, so I identify as Aboriginal.  I researched my family for my degree and have been following the Yuin stories ever since through family and elders and continue to paint these.


‘Coming to Australia’ blends your cultural heritage in such a powerful way. How long did it take to find your family?

LLOYD HORNSBY: My Nan was terrified her children would be taken. She told nobody in her family where her and her husband went to. So, when I had to find family, I had to start from Ground Zero. It has taken me over the past 20 years to find my family, it has been a wonderful journey.

You seem to paint beautiful constellations abundant in dream symbols, can you tell me more about their meaning?

LLOYD HORNSBY: I paint constellations images from the Hubble Telescope and intertwine my stories from the Yuin people into the constellation. The dreaming stories all started in the night sky. The night sky told when the seasons would change, from there they could tell what food would be available. Over 60 thousand years the Australian Aboriginal managed life from the stars.


“Past Warriors” Acylic on canvas
“Art has always been a place where I go to heal, think and find my happy place.”

What was like being asked to show your work at somewhere as iconic as the Louvre?

I did not believe it at first, I had AusTrade check it out for me. Usually, the Australian Government chooses an artist and makes the arrangements, but I was contacted directly and asked if I would consider exhibiting. I was thrilled. Since then, I have been asked to exhibit in the Monat Gallery in Madrid. I was also asked to represent Australia at the Climate Summit in Glasgow this year. It has certainly put my work on the map. My work is different from mainstream Aboriginal Artwork – I combine contemporary with traditional to complete the stories.

Where do you do currently create your paintings?

My wife of 55 years Wendy and I built a house and an art gallery in Glen Innes. Gawura Art Gallery. I have a studio on site and paint each day

How can people find out more about you and your work?

I sell a lot of work online www.gawuragallery.com and within the gallery. If the gallery is closed people can phone and make an appointment to see the artwork and have a chat with me about it. As we live on site this makes it easy.

GAWURA GALLERY, 9979 New England Highway, Glen Innes.

Find out more at info@gawuragallery.com or get in touch E: info@gawuragallery.com

Masterful
Monochromes

Showcasing superb style, our monochrome paisley makes a stunning statement. Ina elegantly wears hers with our ever-so-chic Black Dobby Wool Beret and Jolie Pearl Heel Boot. Magnifique!

complete the look

complete the look

Cosy
et Chic

Cosy et Chic

Inspired by Autumn days spent in artistic spaces, our Cotton Lattice Cardigan is a chic staple for every wardrobe. Add one of our eye-catching scarves, for an effortlessly elegant look.

complete the look

complete the look

Inspired by Autumn days spent in artistic spaces, our Cotton Lattice Cardigan is a chic staple for every wardrobe. Add one of our eye-catching scarves, for an effortlessly elegant look.

A day at the Louvre

The most visited museum in the world with over 35,000 pieces of art on display, the Louvre is an icon of Paris. Home to masterpieces, an expansive Egyptian collection, some enormous French canvases, and one curious little Italian who gets a whole wall to herself, the Louvre can take days to appreciate fully.

Here are 5 tips when visiting to making every minute count!

Buy your ticket in advance to avoid queuing

Specifying a specific date and time slot, e-tickets guarantee entry within the half hour. You can use the priority queues around the Louvre.

Avoid the crowds and visit in the evening

Visit in the evening, the crowds drop away significantly, and the busiest rooms are much quieter. For an unforgettable evening, enjoy late-night opening (until 9.45pm) on Wednesdays, Fridays and first Saturdays of the month and get your one-on-one with the Venus of Milo!

Take time out

Recharge your batteries at any of the 15 cafés and restaurants scattered throughout the Louvre, the Jardin des Tuileries or the Carrousel du Louvre and offering on-site or take-out options.

App it

Download "My Visit to the Louvre" app. Enter the artwork you are looking for and it shows you the way via a 3D itinerary through the museum. Handy! The gallery also has free wi-fi network "Louvre_Wifi_Gratuit" so no data required.

Consider an Audio Guide

None of the signs in the Louvre are in English. So, unless your French est parfait, you might not know exactly what you’re looking at. With 35,000 pieces of art and no stories to go with them, the Louvre Audio Guide might be a good bet.

OPENING HOURS: EVERY DAY EXCEPT TUESDAY 9AM-6PM, WEDNESDAY & FRIDAY UNTIL 9:45PM

RUE DE RIVOLI, 75001 PARIS

It’s all in the details, mon amour!

It’s all in the details, mon amour!

Hand drawn and developed in Melbourne, get swept away by the fine detail of our Embroidered Pintuck Top. Ina is pictured pairing it with our Bengajean® in Black Velvet and Jolie Pearl Heel Boot, très chic!

complete the look

complete the look

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